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Posted by on Mar 25, 2016

Good Friday – The Death of Jesus

Luke 23:44-49

Easter Day this year is on March 27, which makes a short time between Christmas and the Lenten season. As I was putting away our Christmas decorations, I began to take down the manger scene. First I put away the Shepherds, then the Wise Men, Mary and Joseph were next, then I paused; there was one left. I also was in the process of thinking what would I write for this Good Friday meditation and here I am wrapping up what represented the Birth of Jesus. I was confused to say the least. The song I Wonder as I Wander began to come into my mind. I wondered as I finished wrapping, why Jesus had to die for all people, like you and I. I wondered.

As we look back on that terrible day, when darkness filled the sky and despair seemed to reign, Jesus commended his spirit back to God. John’s Gospel declares that Christ was God’s Word made flesh and lived with us. Jesus became God’s voice when he spoke, and his actions became God’s work. Even Jesus’ death became the perfect example of the greatest love that one can offer to another. Jesus’ sacrifice bridged the gap, the curtain was torn, and the divide between mortal and divine was no more. Perhaps the most significant moment was the reaction of the centurion, a senior soldier in the Roman Army, who might have oversaw the crucifixion itself, who was moved by Jesus and declared his innocence. All these things happened for a reason, from his birth to his death, the purpose for Christmas was to be the fate of the Cross.

God gave Jesus to be his restoration work to us. It was the promise that was fulfilled from generations past and generations to come. It is our responsibility, as followers of Christ, to be his continuing work of reconciliation for all people in the world.

Prayer: As we reflect on this day when we remember your loving sacrifice for us, help us to be your words and your actions, in all that we do and say in being a bridge of restoration and reconciliation for all.

 – Nicholas Bullock